Synonyms for Skim:

adj.

all (adjective)
skimmed.

n.

float, fly, dislodge, get out, take off, soar, dart, extract, sweep away, flush out, weed out, take, clear, sail. dip, earn, monetize, cash in, ladle, recover, remove, scoop, claim back, separate, appropriate, collect. examine, fling, lob, browse, hurl, pitch, point, project, toss, throw, aim, direct. hasten, surge, race, outpace, glance, be quick on your feet, carom, strike, Dap, speed, ricochet, charge, gallop. look at, flick through, leaf through, look through, flick. move, shoot. leaf, words, run-through, dip into, investigate, riffle, thumb, glance at, flip through. communication (noun)
skimming.
skim (noun)
cream off, run down, cream, fatless, rake, skimming, glance over, scan, skim over, skimmed, skitter, skip, nonfat, skim off, plane, fat-free.

v.

contact (verb)
skim over.
glide over quickly, lightly (verb)
dart, sail, carom, fly, skitter, ricochet, skip, kiss, soar, shoot, float.
look through cursorily (verb)
glance over, scan, leaf through, examine, browse, riffle, flip through.
motion (verb)
plane.
remove the top part (verb)
cream, brush, glance, graze, scoop, separate, ladle, dip.
touch (verb)
finger, palm, paw, manipulate, kiss, caress, ply, graze, rub, touch, twiddle, feel, brush, palpate, contact.

Other synonyms:

Dap, remove, carom, flick through, hasten, flick. ricochet, riffle, look through, thumb, browse. dip into, leaf, dart. glance, sail, float. fling, fly. look at. shoot. dip. browse
flip through, glance at, leaf through, riffle.
go over
look at.
leaf
thumb.
run-down
run down.
sail
sail.
touch
graze.

Usage examples for skim

  1. When passing such a bush on the qui vive for snipe, how many times have I seen a brilliant streak of azure shoot out from the lower branches and watched a kingfisher skim across the meadow, rising with a piping whistle over the distant hedge! – Wild Life in a Southern County by Richard Jefferies
  2. She stood and watched Colville skim stones over the current. – Indian Summer by William D. Howells
  3. It was an ancient trap left over from the rains of winter, strewn with twigs and small branches so that light wheels might skim with luck, over its shaking holes. – The Happy Foreigner by Enid Bagnold